Letter from Edwin "Ned" Cushman to Susan Cushman Muspratt, n.d. [before 1858]

Dublin Core

Title

Letter from Edwin "Ned" Cushman to Susan Cushman Muspratt, n.d. [before 1858]

Subject

Cushman, Edwin "Ned" Charles, 1838-1909
Muspratt, Susan Cushman, 1822-1859
Finances
Social Events--Travels
Family

Description

Edwin notifies Susan Cushman of his arrival in Bombay, tells her about his experiences there, and what he is planning to do. He almost died during the trip and met a young woman. He brought letters of introduction and wants to join the Indian Navy.

Credit

Library of Congress, Charlotte Cushman Papers, Manuscript Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

Creator

Cushman, Edwin "Ned" Charles, 1838-1909

Source

LoC, CCP 10: 3167-3168

Type

Reference

Letter Item Type Metadata

Text

[3167] My dear Mother
I have arrived in Bombay after a long but pleasant passage of one hundred and fifteen days. I liked the passage to India very much, There 's so much warm weather, which agrees with me very well. We[?] had some very hard gales of wind +++ the cape of Goa & Hope but that only lasted for two or three weeks. I had a very severe attack of cholera the night before Christmas day, and was very nearly a gone case but think to a very large amount of medicine I have nearly recovered. I am now working in  the hold, It is very hard work but still — I like it better than being on deck in the sun doing nothing. One half of the sunda are in the cold and the other half keep watch on the +++ more for show than anything else. You remember the[?] fifth mate who you took such a dislike when You saw him on board. Well he was charged +++ the ship the day for

[3167 reverse] striking the captain. he was fourth mate this voyage  The captain of course would not take him with him any more The +++ has now got a +++ as second mate of a large steamer out here, getting seventy-five rupees a month is equivalent to seven pounds, ten. on   I rather think he has gained by[?] it. We shall not bring a fifth +++ home, as the +++ fifth is to be made fourth. I sent my letters of introduction ashore when I first got in but have not heard of anything but one, that was to a Mr Scovell[?], from the Littledales. I was treated very well, but like every where else in India all they do is to ask you to dinner and then think no more of you. I can not present the one to the governor for he is not present in town, but will be here in a weeks time. I was to[?] have gone to the island of elephants to day

[3168] but hearing that the mail left, day after to-morrow I have stayed on board in order to write to you. It is remarkably dull in Bombay unless you know some one to go to. I wish I knew some one intimately, to whom I could go whenever I liked. as it is now all one can do is to drive about in buggy or palanquin, in a soaring hot sun, and see lots of black people of all casts and sects. +++. +++ who are the most wealthy and influential next to Europeans, Mahommedans,  +++, Sarks[?]. Moors[?]. Hindoos and every thing you can imagine. It is very beautiful to see the temples +++ +++ which are at way[?] turn. We live in the +++ like[?] fighting cocks. We have fowls, capons, meat of all desperation and every thing good  Things are mostly very cheap here especially white trousers, which are only a rupee and a half a pair, which is, three

[3168 reverse] shillings. I have ordered half a dozen pair. If you like I will get a quantity sufficient to last me for several voyages to come, as I shall never again, perhaps, have so good a chance. We shall leave Bombay by the twentieth of January or the first of February at latest so that I shall be at home by the beginning of January. Will any thing wonderful be going on at that time. We have had a very nice girl on board on the passage out and of course I entered the lists in her, cause, and consequently came out victorious. I am now greaty chuffed[?] about her, but I take great credit to myself mind you, as she was the only young lady on board. She has gone up the country now, but I receive letters from her frequently. I had a very narrow escape with my life this passage. We were +++ to off the Cape of Good Hope in as all of wind, and +++ to 

[3167 written across the page] that was entirely out of the question: I was standing on one of the +++ (trying to keep the wind from blowing up the +++ which the Carpenter was +++ down at the time and an immense +++ washed me through one of the ports which was +++ to allow the water to even off the deck I could not see anything but found myself washed back against the ships sic[?] side which I caught hold of and when the ship +++ over again I crawled in looking very much like a drowned rat[?]. That is if any one could have seen me I never had such a narrow escape before. I shall try to get into the Indian navy if I can whilst I live[?] here +++ is a very good place to get on and also the pay is very good. I think by the letter, I have to the governor +++ one I have to a captain in the Indian navy, from five hours ago

[3167 reverse written across the page] will do me a great deal of good. The worst part of it is I shall not be able to come home for two or three years. But I think I would sacrifice that to be able to do for myself. I received your letter on my arrival in Bombay which I am much obliged for I am sending this by the steamer which leaves day after to morrow [sic] and as I shall not be able to do anything tomorrow as we ship over +++ and that will leave me no spare[?] time. to put any more I will conclude this. I hope you are all well at home, So Baby much grown, I expect to find her walking when I get home. Good Bye, and Love to Grandmother, aunty, Uncle Charles and the Doctor and +++ +++ your affectionate son F. E. Cushman.
I have taken a new name. It was on account of a 

[3168 written across the page] misunderstanding of "Ned" and as they had  have never altered it. I mean that +++ the of then wrote to me and +++ it Fred. You dont [sic] know what fan I have had this passage.

From

Cushman, Edwin "Ned" Charles, 1838-1909

To

Muspratt, Susan Cushman, 1822-1859

Location

Bombay

Geocode (Latitude)

18.9387711

Geocode (Longitude)

72.8353355

Extended Date/Time Format (EDTF) Specification

?1858-XX-XX

Social Bookmarking

Geolocation

Collection

Citation

Cushman, Edwin "Ned" Charles, 1838-1909, “Letter from Edwin "Ned" Cushman to Susan Cushman Muspratt, n.d. [before 1858],” Archival Gossip Collection, accessed June 25, 2024, https://www.archivalgossip.com/collection/items/show/385.

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